Agents of Change: Micah Fincher

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There are many people working to create positive change to end sexual violence in the communities we serve. We want to feature as many of them as possible. To submit a recommendation, email prevention@star.ngo.


I would advise young men that we need more role models demonstrating healthy masculinity. Too much of our collective time and energy goes into teaching young women about self-defense and safety tips, and not enough goes to teaching young men about healthy relationships and consent.

– Micah Fincher    

1. What is your connection to STAR?

I have been a donor and supporter of STAR for many years. I currently serve on STAR’s board of directors and as President of STAR’s New Orleans Regional Council.

2. What led you to become involved with STAR and the fight against sexual assault?

STAR’s experience and effectiveness led me to support its work. STAR does incredibly important advocacy and outreach that is desperately needed in our community. It takes a highly professional approach to addressing these issues and supporting survivors, as well as taking a long view toward preventing them in the future through its community change programming.

3. What do you find most rewarding about your involvement in this work, and what motivates you when things get tough?

Working with STAR’s talented management and staff is very rewarding and several have become close friends. A generally positive and optimistic attitude prevents me from getting discouraged.

4. What are some ways you promote positive change in your community?

I promote positive change in my community primarily by supporting STAR and other non-profit organizations. I also strive to practice mutual respect in my own relationships with friends and family, and I try to use my privilege to interrupt unconscious bias within myself and others.

5. What advice would you give to men who are hesitant to get involved in the movement to end sexual violence? 

First, I would advise men to read Asking For It by Kate Harding. In the United States generally, and the South in particular, we live in a rape culture. Harding’s book sets forth the undisputable facts that show how survivors of sexual assault are often marginalized and victimized twice: first by their perpetrator and then again by our criminal justice systems and communities that are prone to victim-blaming.

Second, I would advise young men that we need more role models demonstrating healthy masculinity. Too much of our collective time and energy goes into teaching young women about self-defense and safety tips, and not enough goes to teaching young men about healthy relationships and consent. In my opinion, this is the single greatest barrier to reforming those social norms that sustain and reinforce our rape culture, the destruction of which would dramatically reduce sexual assaults in our community.

 

Get involved and make change with STAR!

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