Agents of Change: Dana Rock

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 I have a great amount of respect and awe for survivors and their willingness to be vulnerable with me. I feel privileged to be a witness to their change process. Seeing that I am making a difference, whether that is from a therapeutic breakthrough or a simple “thank you for listening” at the end of a session, is very gratifying.

– Dana Rock

1. What is your position at STAR?

I am currently a Counselor in STAR’s Baton Rouge office. I provide both individual and group counseling to survivors of sexual trauma and their loved ones. I work to help survivors process and learn how to cope with their trauma by providing a supportive, nonjudgmental space.

2. How did you come to work at STAR and/or in the field of sexual assault prevention/response?

I first came in contact with STAR as a Master of Social Work intern during my first year of graduate school. I always had an interest in sex crimes, which at the time meant that I loved to watch Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. My internship showed me how little I really knew about sexual violence. My eyes were opened to the depth and gravity of this issue. I saw the multiple barriers that survivors face when trying to find both justice and healing and realized that this was not just an interpersonal issue, but a problem that affects the entire community.

Serving sexual assault survivors and working with the inspirational staff at STAR awoke a passion in me. I decided I wanted to focus my career on trauma recovery, and I was lucky enough to be hired as a counselor at STAR directly after graduating.

3. What do you find most rewarding about your work at STAR?

There is so much shame and secrecy surrounding sexual assault. Often, clients have held onto this secret for years and suffered in silence. It takes a great amount of courage to come to a stranger and talk about such a painful experience, and I have a great amount of respect and awe for survivors and their willingness to be vulnerable with me. I feel privileged to be a witness to their change process. Seeing that I am making a difference, whether that is from a therapeutic breakthrough or a simple “thank you for listening” at the end of a session, is very gratifying.

4. What motivates you to keep going when things get difficult or discouraging?

The work can definitely be difficult, so there are several things I do. First, I try to focus on what I can do for someone with the one hour that they are in my office each week. I focus on giving them a space to feel heard, validated, and believed.

Second, I remember to focus on the positives. I think about the inspiring work that I have seen clients do: the survivor of childhood sexual abuse who finally feels free after 30 years of pain, the survivor of rape that now wants to be an advocate in order to help other survivors, the man who now understands that the abuse he suffered was not his fault. Survivors are constantly reminding me that there is hope for healing.

Finally, and most importantly, I lean on others for support. STAR staff are incredibly supportive and we encourage each other to talk when the job is challenging. Also, I am lucky enough to have an amazing group of family and friends to turn to when I am having a hard time.

5. What are some ways you promote positive change in your community, outside of your work duties?

I think the importance of being kind is often underrated. I am often told that I am too nice, but I see this as a positive thing! I strive to be compassionate with others both inside and outside of work by remembering that you never know what someone else is going through.

Also, I educate my family and friends about sexual assault. There are many myths out there that perpetuate rape culture and further discourage survivors from seeking help. When I hear incorrect information, I gently correct people. I’ve had several friends ask me for advice on how to support someone they knew who was assaulted. Simply being known in my small social circle as a trusted person on this issue can have a positive impact on survivors that might not necessarily come in contact with STAR on their own.

6. What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant about becoming an active member of the movement to end sexual trauma?

I would have to say that your help does matter and it is definitely needed! Every step in the right direction, no matter how small, helps put an end to sexual violence. Whether you are currently aware of it or not, this movement is close to you in some way. Statistics show that sexual assault is, unfortunately, very common. There is someone in your life, possibly a friend, family member, or coworker, who is a survivor.

Many people feel at a loss for how to get involved, but it can be as simple as being available to someone else. Survivors are often afraid that their loves ones will not believe them or understand what they have been through. I have three simple suggestions for you: listen, believe, and don’t judge. You cannot imagine the positive impact you can have on someone’s recovery if you do just those three things.

 

If interested in STAR’s free and confidential counseling services, call 1-855-435-STAR. 

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